Mother to Mother breastfeeding support in New Zealand

Connect with a Leader near you

Questions or worries about breastfeeding? Our accredited La Leche League Leaders are experienced mothers who have been trained to provide information and support for breastfeeding. We can help over the phone, you can come along to our informal meetings, or ask a questions via email and on social media.  All of this is free and confidential.

Find your local group

You can find details of our accredited breastfeeding helpers and group meetings across Aotearoa here.

Our mission is to help mothers to breastfeed through mother-to-mother support, education, information, and encouragement and to promote a better understanding of breastfeeding as an important element in the healthy development of the baby and mother.

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Online Facebook Meetings

Meetings are held the last Tuesday of every month from 7:30pm

You can join us for breastfeeding support and information from the comfort of your own home – pyjamas and beverage of your choice optional.

No technical ability required, just join the meeting group and be online that evening.

We’d love to see you there.

17 hours ago

Breastfeeding Support - La Leche League New Zealand
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Nga Mihi to Breastfeeding Support - La Leche League Taranaki these are all great tips for life in the early days with baby 💜💚

IN THE EARLY DAYS
😴Rest and sleep - you have just done a major job growing and giving birth to a baby. Give yourself recovery time
🤱🏻Breastfeed often - breastfeeding and close physical contact with your newborn produces soothing hormones designed to calm you during these early days
🤲Hold your baby - laid back positions can help breastfeeding go well and make you feel confident and calmer
⏰Spend time together - create a comfortable space to spend lots of time together with as much privacy as you need
🚪Limit visitors - it’s ok to limit visitors: put a sign on your door, answer the door in your pj’s, be in bed with baby, this way visitors are less likely to overstay their welcome and may even make you a cuppa
💡Plan ahead - use an answer phone or put your phone on silent to allow you to rest without being disturbed.IN THE EARLY DAYS
😴Rest and sleep - you have just done a major job growing and giving birth to a baby. Give yourself recovery time
🤱🏻Breastfeed often - breastfeeding and close physical contact with your newborn produces soothing hormones designed to calm you during these early days
🤲Hold your baby - laid back positions can help breastfeeding go well and make you feel confident and calmer
⏰Spend time together - create a comfortable space to spend lots of time together with as much privacy as you need
🚪Limit visitors - it’s ok to limit visitors: put a sign on your door, answer the door in your pj’s, be in bed with baby, this way visitors are less likely to overstay their welcome and may even make you a cuppa
💡Plan ahead - use an answer phone or put your phone on silent to allow you to rest without being disturbed.
...

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Toddler nursing - this is all too relatable! Who else has a future Ballet dancer practicing their arabesques while latched?
#ToddlerBreastfeeding #LLLNZ #GymNurstics

Via @MyGeekParents
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Reason Number 2714 to breastfeed your baby 🤱

So you can watch the GOT Series Finale in silence!

Other reasons include but are not limited to...
Hungry, thirsty, bored, connection, sad, snuggles, milk, snacky, pain relief, growth spurt, comfort, sick, tired, a bit peckish, shy, immune boost, overwhelmed...
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Johanna Baty Photography based in Hawke's Bay has created a series of photographs to celebrate and highlight breastfeeding in public. She worked with breastfeeding families to photograph them out and about in Hawke's Bay, some at iconic landmarks and some in usual places they go with their children.

Several mama are LLL Hawke's Bay regulars too
www.Facebook.com/LLLHB
@LLLHB
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In Aotearoa, Pink Shirt Day aims to create schools, workplaces and communities where all people feel safe, valued and respected. As parents, particularly new parents, we can often feel vulnerable to criticism. We may never fully understand what someone else is going through unless we walk their path, but we can endeavour to look out for each other and always use kindness and compassion. Aroha nui 💕

www.pinkshirtday.org.nz
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💚Late Night LLLove💜

🙋‍♀️who’s scrolling right now while cuddled up feeding their baby?

Did you know, breastmilk contains tryptophan, an amino acid used by the body to make melatonin. Melatonin is a hormone that helps induce and regulate sleep. Tryptophan levels in breastmilk rise and fall according to maternal circadian rhythms. Tryptophan levels in breastmilk peak at around 3am.
This means your baby’s rhythm can develop to match your own trough the magic of some late night milky goodness.

From LLLI
“In 2008, Spanish researchers took breast milk samples from 77 women in three-hourly increments and measured the levels of 16 amino acids.(3) Of these, four amino acids that are precursors to activity neurotransmitters (“wakefulness” amino acids) were found to peak during the daytime and reach their lowest levels at night. Conversely, tryptophan, a precursor to melatonin infamous for causing drowsiness, peaks during the night. While these amino acid circadian rhythm indicators are not present during the colostrum phase (with the exception of tryptophan), they do seem to help inform the newborn’s neurological development during transitional and mature milk periods.”

www.llli.org/breast-milks-circadian-rhythms-2/
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It is Allergy Awareness Week this week so here is some information on a particular allergy that might arise with a breastfed baby - a Cow’s Milk Protein Allergy (CMPA) or Intolerance (CMPI)

From LLL International:

“Usually when it is recommended that a breastfeeding mother eliminate dairy produce from her diet, it is because of a problem that may be caused by the protein it contains, not because of lactose intolerance. Human milk is full of lactose, and nature has made certain that babies and toddlers can digest it. Large protein molecules from cow’s milk can pass into human milk fairly intact and it is these particles that can bother a sensitive baby. If your baby has Cow’s milk protein intolerance (CMPI) he might have colic-like symptoms, and be wheezy, vomit, have diarrhea (including bloody diarrhea), constipation, a rash, eczema and/or a blocked nose.
If you suspect your baby is sensitive to the cow’s milk protein in your diet you can remove dairy products and see if it makes a difference. It can take up to 21 days for all traces of cow’s milk protein to leave your system so it’s best to wait for two to three weeks to evaluate the results. Some babies will react well if you remove visible dairy products such as milk, yoghurt, cheese, cream and ice-cream; others will not show any improvement unless you remove every trace of cow’s milk protein from your diet so you may need to read the labels of all the food you eat and eliminate hidden sources.
Many babies grow out of their sensitivity, so even if your baby is affected you may be able to add dairy back into your diet as your baby gets older. Some mothers wait until their baby has weaned to reintroduce dairy to their diet”

💚links to resources in the comments💜
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